Vol. 59, No. 1, Spring/Summer 2021


PHILADELPHIA’S LAST LIGHTHOUSE: THE LIGHT AT TURTLE ROCK AND A RECONSIDERATION OF

“OBSOLETE” LANDMARKS AS BUILT HERITAGE

(p. 1-21)


Charles H. Wade

Socioeconomic and Demographic Planner

Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission


Abstract


Boathouse Row, in Philadelphia’s Fairmount Park, is one of the city’s longstanding

heritage landscapes. Among this historic collection of buildings stands Turtle Rock

Lighthouse, Philadelphia’s only remaining lighthouse and one of the few standing in

Pennsylvania. Notably, Turtle Rock is embedded within one of the boathouses, the

Sedgeley Club, which was the first women’s athletic club founded in the United States.

This paper traces the co-development of both Turtle Rock Lighthouse and the Sedgeley

Club into a single institution as they became significant but lesser-known features

of both Philadelphia’s social history and heritage landscape. Through this case

study’s deeper examination of the historical and geographical contexts, I argue that

lighthouses are too often overlooked or disregarded elements of cultural landscapes in

scholarship and should be better appreciated aspects of our heritage and built environment.



ASSESSING MITIGATION STRATEGIES FOR REDUCING BAT FATALITIES

AT WIND ENERGY FACILITIES: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

(22-32)


Nicholas A. Moctezuma, Brian W. Okey and Sudeshna Ghosh

Department of Geography, Geology, Environment, and Planning

Indiana University of Pennsylvania


Abstract


The growth of utility-scale wind energy in the U.S. in recent decades has been fueled

by environmental priorities and new technologies. However, the resulting transformation

of habitats and more direct, often fatal, interactions between avian wildlife and

turbines have led to mitigation strategies to reduce conflicts involving birds and (more

recently) bats. This paper focuses on approaches to reduce bat mortality at “wind

farms.” Current literature is reviewed in order to compare different strategies being

implemented or researched. Our findings suggest greater potential for reductions in

bat fatalities when turbine cut-in speeds are employed than when ultrasonic or other

deterrent methods are used. The limited number of articles addressing outcomes under

different operational regimes underscores the need for further research on both the

methods and relative costs of mitigation strategies.



TOPOGRAPHIC MAP INTERPRETATION TECHNIQUES USED TO DETERMINE

CASSELMAN RIVER DRAINAGE BASIN HISTORY, MARYLAND

AND PENNSYLVANIA: A NEW PARADIGM DEMONSTRATION PAPER

(p. 33-56)


Eric Clausen

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

Temple University


Abstract


Topographic map evidence for previously unexplained Casselman River direction

changes (including where it joins the Youghiogheny River) indicates prolonged and

massive volumes of south-oriented water once flowed across the Conemaugh-Casselman

River drainage divide and formed diverging southwest- and southeast-oriented

channels with the southwest-oriented flow joining south-oriented flow on today’s

north-oriented Youghiogheny River alignment. The southeast-oriented channel eroded

a water gap across an emerging Negro Mountain and then a diverging southwestoriented

channel followed the northeast-oriented Casselman River alignment to reach

south-oriented flow on the now north-oriented Youghiogheny River alignment while

the southeast-oriented channel and a southeast-oriented channel which diverged from

the southwest-oriented channel eroded the Flaughtery and Piney Creek water gaps

into an emerging Meadow Mountain. Conemaugh River drainage system development

ended south-oriented flow into the Casselman River drainage basin while regional

uplift caused drainage reversals to create today’s northeast-, northwest-, and

southwest-oriented Casselman River.



A CHANGE OF SCALE IN THE EXAMINATION OF CHILDREN’S BLOOD

LEAD LEVELS IN READING, PENNSYLVANIA

(p. 57-74)


Robert C. Ziegenfus

Department of Geography

Kutztown University of Pennsylvania


Abstract


At the author’s request, the Pennsylvania Department of Health provided blood lead

data for children living within the 69 block groups in Reading for the period 2015-

2019. Of the 12,232 children tested, 10.9% were considered to have an elevated blood

lead level. There were no statistically significant differences between males and females

by contrast with other studies. Block groups with the highest percent of elevated

test results were concentrated in the center of the city. Old housing, the percent of

Hispanic renters, a less than high school level of education, and low incomes were the

most important risk factors correlated with the elevated blood levels. The techniques

demonstrated herein could serve as a model to target the geographic areas of greatest

concern.



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