Vol. 58, No. 2, Fall/Winter 2020


ALL PRESERVATION ISN’T LOCAL: AN INVENTORY AND ANALYSIS

OF HISTORIC PRESERVATION ORDINANCES IN PENNSYLVANIA

(p. 1-17)


Steven Burg

Department of History and Philosophy

Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania


Angela Cuthbert

Department of Geography

Millersville University of Pennsylvania


Abstract


This research examines the extent to which local governments in Pennsylvania utilize

their statutory power to regulate cultural and historic resources in their jurisdictions.

The study details the first comprehensive statewide inventory and analysis of historic

preservation ordinances in Pennsylvania municipalities. The research considers historic

preservation ordinances enabled by the two statutory pathways provided by state

law, the Historic District Act of 1961 and the Municipalities Planning Code of 1968.

The research employs several methodologies including an online survey of county

planning directors, zoning ordinance audits, and sociodemographic analyses. The

findings include the identification of 294 municipalities engaged in historic preservation,

the limited diversity of regulatory approaches and important sociodemographic

factors that help to explain why some municipalities engage in historic preservation

and others do not.



THE DIAMOND IN THE ROUGH: URBAN SLUM DEVELOPMENT

IN DELHI, INDIA

(p. 18-33)


Richard L Wolfel

Center for Languages, Cultures and Regional Studies

United States Military Academy


Abstract


The ascendance of the modern global economy influences rural to urban migration

and the growth of slum communities. The growth of slum communities creates a challenge

for city leadership that attempts to create an urban environment that appears

clean, organized, and right for investment. Such slum clearance in the name of progress

is a common theme in Delhi, India. Many slums have been cleared in the name of

creating a “world class Delhi.” Paradoxically, while slums are being cleared throughout

Delhi, Sanjay Colony has not only been ignored, but in some elements, the leadership

of Delhi has invested in Sanjay. Using a model of urban development, this paper explains

the internal dynamics of Sanjay and shows how Sanjay Colony’s unique locational

characteristics makes it less of a target for removal in a city where slum removal

is a common theme in urban redevelopment.



WATER QUALITY OF STREAMS IN THE MISSISSIPPI ALLUVIAL PLAIN:

AN EASTERN ARKANSAS EXAMPLE

(p. 34-54)


Hubert B. Stroud

Department of Criminology, Sociology, and Geography

Arkansas State University


Amelia K. Atwell

Environmental Sciences Program

Arkansas State University


Abstract


Water pollution is a significant issue in various parts of the United States and is particularly

problematic in the Mississippi Alluvial Plain. In far too many cases, buffers

are not provided along drainage ways and steams and the result has been high levels

of pollution. This article uses the Cache River Basin as a case study to illustrate the

extent of the problem in eastern Arkansas. Specific water quality parameters are used

to illustrate important differences in temperature, dissolved oxygen, and turbidity for

two sub-watersheds within the Cache River Basin where land use practices vary tremendously

and the impact on surface streams is dramatically different. By almost

every measure, water quality is higher in the sub-watershed with a higher percentage

of woodland and more extensive stream buffers thereby illustrating the importance of

watershed management and the need for protective buffers along streams as a means

to improve water quality.



THE STATE OF DESPAIR IN PENNSYLVANIA: A STATISTICAL

AND SPATIAL ANALYSIS

(p. 55-75)


Robert C. Ziegenfus

Department of Geography

Kutztown University of Pennsylvania


Abstract


Deaths of despair are deaths caused by suicide, alcohol abuse, and drug overdoses.

Age-adjusted data were analyzed for these causes individually and collectively. Maps

and graphs depict the temporal and spatial aspects of these rates for Pennsylvania

counties. The two regions with the greatest concentration of deaths from the despair

causes are southwestern and northeastern Pennsylvania. Nineteen socioeconomic

variables were examined to determine the primary correlates for each despair cause.

Of these, percent in poverty with low levels of education, percent old housing, percent

public insurance coverage (Medicaid/Medicare), percent unemployed and percent disability

were positively associated with despair deaths.


The Pennsylvania Geographical Society exists to promote effective geographic teaching, research, and literacy.


Click here to contact the webmaster

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software